My Indonesian Mother Isn't Perfect Either- But She's Learning | The Immigrant Experience

By: Gabriela Nadeau, Age 17 

   Two years ago, my mom and I were leaving Marshalls, calling after a woman who had taken our umbrella.

    “I’m sorry,” she said. “I thought it was the store’s umbrella.”

   My mom looked at her, dumbfounded. It sounded like a silly excuse.

   The woman squinted at her, then looked at me. “Does she speak English?”

    “Yes,” my mom interjected. “I do.”

   My mom is from Indonesia. Her skin is dark, much darker than mine. Prejudice is thrown at her everyday; people treat her like a second-class citizen, questioning her right to be an American. She passed her citizenship test. She pays her taxes. She loves this country. None of that matters.

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How to be an Activist in a Small Town

 

 

This is How to be an Activist, a reoccurring blog series published by Day of the Girl. To learn more about How to be an Activist, please click here.

It’s easy to fulfill a passion for activism if you live in a place like Chicago or New York. These massive cities have all kinds of opportunities for young activists looking to get involved, whether it’s interning or volunteering at social justice organizations, attending rallies or big events every other week, and more. But, if you live in Central Illinois (like yours truly) or a similarly overlooked location, you’ll quickly discover that finding an outlet for your activism can be challenging. But never fear: where there’s a will, there’s a way. Besides just taking the online route (which you can learn more about in a different post) there are multiple ways to be an activist within your local community.

 

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How to be an Activist: White Allyship

Demonstrators gather in protest after the shooting of Philandro Castille. St. Anthony, Minnesote, July 10th 2016. -Photo by Adam Bettcher/Reuters

 

Demonstrators gather in protest of the shooting of Philandro Castile. St. Anthony Minnesota, July 10 2016. - Photo by REUTERS/Adam Bettcher

This is How to be an Activist, a reoccurring blog series published by Day of the Girl. To learn more about How to be an Activist, please click here.

Being a feminist activist means standing in solidarity with every marginalized group. Feminism has become an increasingly mainstream movement, but in pop culture’s version of feminism, nonwhite marginalized people are often excluded. Specifically, many white women activists often neglect to highlight the struggles of people of color in their fights. Here, you’ll find a few tips about what is required of you as a white ally. If you truly want to consider yourself an activist, it is imperative to read on, and more importantly, continue pursuing resources like these.

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How to be an Activist When You're Alone in Your Views

A lone anti-war protester confronts police in Whitehall during the Cuban Missile Crisis, London, 1962 - Photo by Don McCullin

 A lone anti-war protester confronts police in Whitehall during the Cuban Missile Crisis, London, 1962 - Photo by Don McCullin 

This is How to be an Activist, a reoccurring blog series published by Day of the Girl. To learn more about How to be an Activist, please click here.

Many of us feel like we’re stuck in a place where no one sees our work as valuable. Being  the only one in your family, friend group, or area who cares about social justice can be hard. It can feel like a constant battle, and sometimes you might want to give up on activism altogether. Stick with it! It’s an uphill battle, but every single person matters in causes like ours, and knowing that you helped create change will be its own reward in the end.

Here are a few things to remember when you're trying to do good social justice work without support from the people around you.

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Introducing: How to be an Activist

How to be an Activist is a new original blog series that will be running on the Day of the Girl-US Blog. Here you will find all posts that have been published for How to be an Activist thus far. If you have a question or would like to contribute to How to be an Activist, please email dayofthegirl@gmail.com with subject line “Activist”.

In How to be an Activist we show you how anyone--and we mean anyone--can be an activist. As the creator and editor of this series, I wanted young activists to know that though we all have our own unique circumstances, and advantages and disadvantages in our lives, there are still ways we can  involve ourselves in activism and contribute to our communities.

In this series we take some of the most common quandaries concerning activism --“I want to get involved in social justice, but I don’t live in a big town where there are many opportunities for me!”, “How can I, as a white person, show support to the POC of America?”, “How do I balance my health as an activist?”-- and dedicate a blog post to approaching the topic, with tips and suggestions for you. We give advice based on your specific circumstance, showing you how to be an activist under different conditions. This series is written by other young activists who know how you feel and have integrated their own experiences into the topic they are writing about.

 You can be an activist no matter who you are, and we’re here to prove it!”

 - Adriana Chavez, Day of the Girl Action Team | April 21, 2017

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On Harry Styles And Celebrating Basic Respect From Men

By Eliana Stanislawski, 21

Teenage heartthrob Harry Styles blew up the internet a couple of days ago when made the groundbreaking statement that girls should be taken seriously. People shared his quote from a recent Rolling Stone article all over the place:

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Punk Feminism: Sofia Verbilla

Day of the Girl's "Punk Feminism" series highlights the voices of people in marginalized groups in the punk/DIY music scene. It is such an honor to talk to musicians about their experiences in this community. This time, I had the pleasure of having a conversation with Sofia Verbilla of Harmony Woods, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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Why I Don't Support the Travel Ban | The Immigrant Experience

By Alejandra Granado

Having come from immigrant parents I’ve always been told how lucky I am to have been born in the U.S. and to have the wonderful opportunities that I do. Although I am not an immigrant, immigration has played a huge role in my life. Every so often, I think about how lucky I am, that I get to go away to university right after high school, and don’t have to sit at home to cook and clean like many oppressed women in other countries have to instead of receiving an education. I also think of how fortunate I am to be able to get an education, to then get a career that’ll make me a nice salary, which will allow me to support myself and not depend on others. The reason I’m able to do all of this and more is because my mother was lucky enough to immigrate to this country 20 years ago

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100 Years With Progress Yet to be Made | The Immigrant Experience

By Brindha Kodlapur, age 17

We are raised to conquer our dreams, not to be reared for marriage

   ...

“एकनौकरीपानेकेलिएएकमात्रउद्देश्यएकउपयुक्तपत्नीबनानेकेलिएहै”

“The only purpose to women gaining a job, is to make a suitable wife”.

100 years later, and this Hindu moral still applies to the lives of many Indian women around the world. Historically, marriage in many cultures is an everlasting social construct placed upon women. Whether it is the 21% of women married before the age of 18 in Pakistan or the widely popular ‘mail order bride’ program prevalent in Russia, marriage has often been a dynamic preventing women from achieving their goals in life. Marriage shouldn’t be a hindrance, but rather a personal choice.

Women in these marriages are often forced to stay at home, thus giving up their forward dreams, or are  subject to the constant desire of their husbands in order to produce children - often causing domestic violence. Of course, the causes for this constant discrimination can often be attributed to our culture's social roots of males exerting their masculinity over females. Yet, this is no excuse for the way women have been treated. Although most Americans believe that these orthodox ways are limited to third world nations with a plethora of poverty, it is time to accept that America may not be as perfect of a country as immigrants hope it to be.

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Black Girl Magic Series: Akirah Crawford

Throughout this year, we have learned about inspiring girls and women who truly define Black Girl Magic. We have heard from fashion designers, community activists, filmmakers, and students. I started the series with Day of the Girl in the Summer of 2016, and many people enjoyed reading all the amazing interviews and being inspired by each and every girl. I created the Black Girl Magic series to celebrate black girls and women who are doing amazing things. To end the series, I had the wonderful opportunity to interview my cousin Akirah Crawford. Akirah is a community organizer, educator, and a student. She won the Fulbright Scholarship, which gave her the opportunity to travel to Malaysia to teach English and develop programs. Akirah graduated from Virginia State University and is currently in graduate school. She is currently serving in Swaziland Africa as a Peace Corps volunteer. Read on to hear her inspiring story.

 

Name: Akirah Crawford

Social Media:

Facebook: Kirah Simone

Instagram: akirah_simone  

Blog: soulfulrealblog.wordpress.com

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