How to be a Powerful Woman

Do you want to be the next Emma Watson or Michelle Obama? Read on. These women are strong, empowering, and confident, characteristics a lot of us want to have. Before I list some advice for how to embody these, remember: you are capable of achieving everything you have ever dreamed or desired. That does not mean everything is always going to work out for you; rather, it means that you are strong and able to keep pushing. In fact, sometimes it’s better if you end up facing adversity. No matter your how you look, what characteristics you identify with, or even previous failures, if you have a dream, you need to have the mindset that nothing will bar you from reaching your goal. Let’s begin.

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How to be an Activist in High School

 

By Jackie Logsted, Age 17

This is How to be an Activist, a reoccurring blog series published by Day of the Girl. To learn more about How to be an Activist, please click here.

When you’re in high school, you are constantly told what you cannot do: You can’t go out after 10. No, you can’t take the car. You can’t go out with that boy. You can’t wear that shirt at school. Your generation doesn’t care about anything real. You don’t understand what it means to love someone yet. You wouldn’t get it, you’re too young.

I know all of this because I’m seventeen. With all the voices in our ears, it can feel limiting to be our age; we have less accessibility to resources, and people tend to take us less seriously. These things may look like mile high hurdles to jump through before you can try to create something meaningful.

Noel Paul Stookey recently told me that the key to meaningful activism is to “grow where you’re planted.” It can feel incredibly daunting to be an activist when you’re in high school, but by ignoring the things that you can’t do yet and taking advantage of the things you can do, we can make meaningful differences in the world, before we can legally vote

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Loving Your Summer Body

Loving Your Summer Body

Written by Kjerstyn Jordheim, Age 15

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   Throughout the summer, it is common to hear the term “bikini body” used to describe girls’ fitness goals.  A bikini body is usually thought of as skinny, small, but is in truth, an often unrealistic ideal.  For many girls, the goal of having a “bikini body” can destroy confidence and positive body image.

   Loving your body can be hard, especially during the summer.  But when we treat our bodies with love rather than being obsessed with an unhealthy image, amazing things can happen.  Here are some suggestions how you can love your summer body the way it is.

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10 Empowering Women Who are Changing the World

By Peyton Mann, Age 16

These ten women are changing the world today. Some are writers, actors, filmmakers, former first ladies but all of them are feminists. This list is in no way complete, these women are the people who I admire and who some might not have thought of before. I hope this list inspires you like the women on it inspire me.

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The Wage Gap: Myth or Reality?

By Kjerstyn Jordheim, Age 15 

 

The wage gap is an especially popular and controversial topic in the news, but do most people really know what is?

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Strength is Beauty: Teen Elite Swimmers on Body Image

 

By: Kjerstyn Jordheim, Age 15 

“Body image” is a buzzword lately. We all have ideas about our bodies, whether we like them or not. However, for lots of girls, body image is more complicated than confidence.

   As an elite swimmer, I am one of those girls. I have spent countless hours trying to accept my body for what it is: a muscular, but small, swimming machine. I may not be the curvy, seductive-looking goddess that I think is the desired look by most teens, but my body is perfect for what I do. Contrary to what some people may think, athletes struggle with body image and weight anxiety just as much as anyone else- sometimes perhaps even more.  

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Why I Choose to be a Feminist

By Tanya Singh, Age 17

“I myself have never been able to find out precisely what feminism is: I only know that people call me a feminist whenever I express sentiments that differentiate me from a doormat.” 

― Rebecca West

   I grew up in India. It was a time when the word feminism had not made its way into my vocabulary. And somehow, I was a feminist even before I knew what it meant. I didn’t yet realize that names carry such immense powers, which can alter the course of many lives. I talked of things that mattered to me as a woman, without realizing that my voice had hundreds of other voices behind it reciting a similar verse, loud and confident. Sometimes, unknowingly, we become voices that sing as we bind ourselves in a tryst with courage and wisdom. Feminism is a trust, a regenerative belief: a strength that doesn’t quite age.

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My Indonesian Mother Isn't Perfect Either- But She's Learning | The Immigrant Experience

By: Gabriela Nadeau, Age 17 

   Two years ago, my mom and I were leaving Marshalls, calling after a woman who had taken our umbrella.

    “I’m sorry,” she said. “I thought it was the store’s umbrella.”

   My mom looked at her, dumbfounded. It sounded like a silly excuse.

   The woman squinted at her, then looked at me. “Does she speak English?”

    “Yes,” my mom interjected. “I do.”

   My mom is from Indonesia. Her skin is dark, much darker than mine. Prejudice is thrown at her everyday; people treat her like a second-class citizen, questioning her right to be an American. She passed her citizenship test. She pays her taxes. She loves this country. None of that matters.

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How to be an Activist in a Small Town

 

 

This is How to be an Activist, a reoccurring blog series published by Day of the Girl. To learn more about How to be an Activist, please click here.

It’s easy to fulfill a passion for activism if you live in a place like Chicago or New York. These massive cities have all kinds of opportunities for young activists looking to get involved, whether it’s interning or volunteering at social justice organizations, attending rallies or big events every other week, and more. But, if you live in Central Illinois (like yours truly) or a similarly overlooked location, you’ll quickly discover that finding an outlet for your activism can be challenging. But never fear: where there’s a will, there’s a way. Besides just taking the online route (which you can learn more about in a different post) there are multiple ways to be an activist within your local community.

 

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How to be an Activist: White Allyship

Demonstrators gather in protest after the shooting of Philandro Castille. St. Anthony, Minnesote, July 10th 2016. -Photo by Adam Bettcher/Reuters

 

Demonstrators gather in protest of the shooting of Philandro Castile. St. Anthony Minnesota, July 10 2016. - Photo by REUTERS/Adam Bettcher

This is How to be an Activist, a reoccurring blog series published by Day of the Girl. To learn more about How to be an Activist, please click here.

Being a feminist activist means standing in solidarity with every marginalized group. Feminism has become an increasingly mainstream movement, but in pop culture’s version of feminism, nonwhite marginalized people are often excluded. Specifically, many white women activists often neglect to highlight the struggles of people of color in their fights. Here, you’ll find a few tips about what is required of you as a white ally. If you truly want to consider yourself an activist, it is imperative to read on, and more importantly, continue pursuing resources like these.

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