Suey Park and Asian American Feminism

By Maggie McMorrow 

Suey Park is a 23 year old freelance writer and the woman behind

#notyourasiansidekick, a hashtag that trended worldwide when it first came about in

December 2013. Park’s intention with the tweet was to start a nationwide discussion

about Asian American feminism. Park planned to start the discussion with only a few

close friends and was shocked at the multitude of responses she received within hours

of posting the first tweet. Park said “Honestly I am ill-prepared for the magnitude of

what is happening and I think that’s okay because I don’t think I should be the only one

having these conversations or the only one speaking for millions of people when I’m

trying to say that we’re nuanced and not just one person,” Park is Korean American and

has found that when the topic of feminism is brought up, there is not always a place for

Asian Americans. Therefore her intention with this campaign was not to acquire a seat

at the feminist table, but to create a forum for discussion where no group is left out or

considered a “side-kick.”

 

 

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Bring Back Our Girls. Then What?

By Chika Nwaka 

A thought has lingered at the back of my mind since learning of the girls’ potential return on October 21st  – What’s next for them? Perhaps I am looking too far ahead but it saddens me that their return is truly only the beginning of solving what is a deep flaw in society today.After six months of surviving unimaginable circumstance, once they are home they will not only be deeply traumatized, but also still at risk. From what I have read, there is currently nothing stopping something like this from reoccurring.

But now she’s too afraid to go back to school. She says she wants to be a farmer and tend to a small plot of land with her mother.” – The Guardian

 

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Girl to Girl

By Ava McElhone Yates 

As someone who has never described herself as athletic, playing sports is relatively new to me. Growing up I tried some recreation leagues once or twice but I never stuck with anything and didn’t really have fun. Now I go to a school where I have sports as a requirement. The concept was daunting at first but I’ve managed to take a few things from it all. In fact, even more important than the sport is the team.

 

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Urbana IL

By Ginger Mayo 

“The concept that being a female should keep me from doing certain things in life has never really occurred to me. I’m sure I can attribute that to my own parents and how they demonstrated what being a successful adult is, not just a successful woman. So of course the realization that there is a whole population of women my age who believe that they should only pursue certain jobs or ambitions because those are the “girl jobs” absolutely breaks my heart. Being involved in this rally was a no-brainer for me. This is a fun and engaging way to show off all the awesome stuff women and girls can do simply because they went for it, not because of their gender. Being part of this rally is so special to me because being a woman is not a small or easy job. Whether you are a CEO or a stay at home mom, it’s good to have encouragement that what you are doing everyday really matters. Getting the chance to empower and inspire young women in their pursuit of greatness is a beautiful thing. My favorite part of the process of planning for this event has been the excitement on the faces of the women I have invited to be speakers or simply to be involved in some way. To see them light up with that same feeling I know I get when I have the chance to celebrate what it really means to be a strong female is simply the best.”

 

– Kristen Plemons, Age 24 – University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

 

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Five Months Later.

By Diana AbouSaleh 

It’s been five months since extremist anti-Western group Boko Haram kidnapped roughly 275 Nigerian girls from their schools. I’m somewhat relieved to hear that they will be released soon, but that doesn’t mean that these atrocities will stop. This isn’t the first time this has happened nor will it be the last. Let’s recall the brave 14-year-old Pakistani girl Malala, who about a year ago, was shot in the head. And miraculously survived. She was the target of the Taliban threats ever since she started advocating for a girl’s basic right to education. Even since her recovery, she has been become a role model for women all over the world, promoting pacifism and raising her voice for women’s education rights.

 

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An Analysis of #heforshe

By Maggie McMorrow

 

I, like many others in the world, recently watched, and was affected by Emma

Watson’s speech to the UN on gender inequality and introducing the new campaign

#heforshe. My initial reaction to the speech was one of positivity and appreciation for

someone articulating some of the issues I have had with the word ‘feminist’ over the

years. But since watching the speech I have read both positive and negative reviews

ranging from calling Watson a game-changer to asking if she is the right woman for the

job. I see both sides of the argument.

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Stopping Trans* Violence is EVERYONE’s Responsibility

By: Emily Zhang + Ginger Mayo

TRIGGER WARNING: discusses violence against trans* women and violence against people of color.

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High Heels, High Pain

By Hannah Byl 

Recently in my Cultural Anthropology class, my teacher was discussing beauty

standards around the world; and particularly pointed out how women are made to do often

painful and unhealthy things to themselves because men like it that way, which then becomes an

accepted part of that culture. For modern times, my teacher gave the example of women

wearing high heels, because “even though podiatrists and doctors have said for years they are

harmful to feet, women still wear them because men have told them to.” About half the class

was males, and almost every one of them was very quick to decry “But I actually don’t like when

girls wear high heels!”

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Being Day of the Girl

By Ava McElhone Yates  

I’ve been to New York plenty of times, but I never would have thought that I’d be

going there for an international meeting at the Turkish Consulate in the United

Nations Plaza. In fact, the idea was so extraordinary for my thirteen–year-old self

that I rushed to apply as fast as I could in fear of letting the opportunity slip into the

hands of someone else. I was determined to go and I did.

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Success and the Double Standard

By Ginger Mayo 

I created this post as a response to my friend Olivia’s doubts on a New Yorker article she read. As a girl, I’m naturally inclined to read into criticisms that seem focused on superficial details of female artists. I find female writers are often simplified to meet a certain symbol, which often neglects to recognize the complexities and depth of their works. Much to my chagrin, Alex Ross’ analysis of Wharton felt angry and invasive – it stirred an agitation in me, because yet again I read an article desperately trying to discount the success of a woman. 

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