Evolution of Nails

By Natalia Atwal 

Over the past few years America has seen a boom in incidents of date rape. Date rape in defined as non-consensual sexual intercourse and  is impacting our society. According to a poll completed by the University of Sciences 1 in 4 college aged women face date rape or attempted date rape in their college years.

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Plus Sized. So What?

By Ginger Mayo 

I spend a lot of time on social media, which means I see my fair share of links circulating the web. Mostly I get links to things like Kylie Jenner’s Before and After photos and 17 Amazing Foods You’ve Never Heard Of – but increasingly, links pop up related to ‘plus sized role models.’

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The Problem of Girl on Girl Hate.

By Hannah Byle 

As a girl (especially a high school girl), one thing we all seem to hear at one point or another is
insults from other girls. They often are comments about our clothes, or bodies; telling us our
skirts are too long or too short, we wear too much or too little makeup; etc., or about our
personalities, we’re too loud or quiet, too flirty or shy. Whatever they are, we start feeling like we
can never win with each other, and we feel bad for our differences. While these comments
seem to simply be rude, the problem really goes much deeper, and these comments can
actually be very harmful, for several reasons.

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Laughing it Off: The Resilience of a Design for Happiness

By Calla Gilson 

I laughed out of the ridicule of the statement. I laughed out of the curiosity of the mentality. I laughed because I could, and I laughed because every woman should.

When I heard the news of Turkish Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arınc’s comments this week, I laughed. Despite the sadness that grew in my heart for the serious attrition that his entirely misguided comments indicated, I couldn’t help but laugh at the obscurity of his words:

“She will not laugh in public. She will not be inviting in her attitudes and will protect her chasteness.”

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Elliot Rodgers: The (Forgotten) Angry Misogynist (With a Gun)

By Anna B. Roach 

    About two months ago, a friend of mine linked me to a parody. It was a prototypical fedora-wearing Men’s Rights Activist-type entitled 22-year-old whining about how little success he had had with women. As a parody, I found it good – he put into unsettling words the tacit assumptions behind men who cat-call, commit sexual harassment, and otherwise assume women’s responsibility to please them. Without restraint, he voiced absurdly extreme beliefs about the women he deserved. He spent money on clothes, he reasoned, and was half-white – thus, he deserved a girlfriend. In fact, he didn’t understand why he didn’t have a blue-eyed, blonde, white girlfriend, a type that he unashamedly held above all others. His speech was evidently rehearsed and not dissimilar to that of a movie villain – slow, chilling, bitter, and carefully thought-out.

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Bringing Back Our Girls.

By Rachel Auslander 

On April 14, Boko Haram kidnapped more than 200 girls from a school in Nigeria. Activists created the hashtag #bringbackourgirls to draw attention to the abduction, and it worked, at least for a while. Over four million tweets mentioned the hashtag, but the use of it has faded out, along with the search for the girls. Over 100 days later, most of the girls are still in inhumane conditions and have not been found. Society has turned their backs on assertively rescuing the girls from their captors and giving them the education that they deserve. What is it going to take for the Nigerian government and the global community to realize that how they are dealing with this situation is a representation of how they are addressing education of women in all countries with gender inequality?

 

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#strongerthan : Natalia Atwal

Malala Yousafzai a young women from a country close to our own. However the ideals of this country are far from our own.

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#strongerthan : Katie Key

By Katie Key  

In my opinion, Malala Day is already a huge success. The fact that there are already change makers, inequality fighters, and terrorist survivors is enough to celebrate Malala Day every day. However, none of it would have been as influential and powerful if it wasn’t for Malala Yousafzai. She may be three years younger than me, but she is my hero and my inspiration.  The greatest part about Malala Day and the ideals that surround it is that none of those characteristics and demographics – age, religion, race, gender, socioeconomic status – should define someone or make them unequal. All of it doesn’t matter. Malala has taught me that I am #StrongerThan all of those things that people define me as. Malala has taught me that there truly is nothing as powerful than being #StrongerThan those that want to see you fail.  Malala has taught me that if I want to be a change maker and inequality fighter that I am #StrongerThan any doubt in my mind. Why? Because together we are #StrongerThan any thing that could stop us. That is why Malala Day is already a huge success…and it is only just getting started.

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#stronger than: Ginger Mayo

By Ginger Mayo 

On this day, I thank Malala Yousafzai for reminding me that there are no excuses. There are no excuses for young girls not to receive adequate educations. There are no excuses for women to be shamed into covering their bodies against their will. There are no excuses for young girls being too scared to walk home, because men will cat call and harass them. There are no excuses for lack of access to important medical resources based on gender.

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#Selfie

By Sharmin Shanur

A few months ago the dj mix #selfie made its way into mainstream media and completely engulfed the minds of young adolescents. It played in every radio station and was hummed in the mouths of all the young people that were attracted to it. However, along being produced by the famous Chainsmokers and containing extremely catchy tunes, the song along with its music video had many implications about females and popularized gender stereotypes. The mix #selfie begins by a few musical chords and is then followed by a woman who converses with the audience about a man named Jason. She is portrayed as an extremely spiteful young woman, who constantly criticizes the people, especially women, around her in ways that are extremely demeaning. With the narrator, stands a woman whose name, we as the audience, never learn. All we know about the second woman is that she constantly looks at herself in the mirror, shifts her body from side to side to show herself or the audience her exposed curves, plays with the volume of her hair, and seldom listens to her friend talking because she is too occupied with her self image. All the actions and characteristics aforementioned provide a very negative view of the girls- I realized that they were nothing more than sexualized objects in the music video. In terms of the narrator, her sole existence seems to be linked to Jason and his view of her. In all of her selfies she wants to “look tan,” “be clever” with her captions, and gain and an extreme number of likes within a few minutes. Although I would have liked to believe that all of her desires were to satisfy herself, I was deterred from that idea because the music ends with her saying “Oh my god, Jason just texted me. Should I go home with him? I guess I took a good selfie.” Both the music video and the lyrics ends in a way that shows me the girl never fully created her own self worth or self-esteem because all of her actions were never for her sake, but for the sake of another man.

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