The Cycle of Abuse Hits the Sidewalk

By: Shannon S.

It’s Saturday night and you’re out having a good time downtown: hanging out with friends, bar hopping, and general shenanigans. Then you come across a woman passed out on the street. As I came across such a scene, I paused and turned, concerned for this woman I had never met. A man was trying to help her, then another man came over and started yelling. He then began to violently pull the woman from the ground during which her head hit a glass window.

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How I Became a Feminist

By: Kari S.

I have wanted to write this for a long time, and these kinds of writings are one of my favorite to read, as well. I suppose being a part of an activist group or political party is similar to being a member of a church or something, in the sense that we often relate our testimony – our journey to how we became a part of this. We’re a community with a common goal, but with unique backgrounds, and I don’t know, I have always found “how I became a feminist” stories to be quite enlightening and interesting.

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Todas As Coisas Possíveis E Impossíveis

A reflection written by Calla Gilson, 17, a participant in the Girls Empowerment Seminar in Brazil earlier this past August. This was originally written for Partners of the Americas

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Girls Talk (Video)

By: Joanne C.

Check out this video from the American Psychological Association, Girls Talk: The Sexualization of Girls. Six middle school girls respond to images in the media.

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What's SHE Running For?

By: Calla G.

Last week as I sat in my AP Government class, my friends began to share about their weekend adventures helping with a local campaign of my friend’s parent. When my teacher overheard, she asked the girls; “what is Anna’s father running for?” The girls quickly corrected my teacher-it wasn’t Anna’s father whose campaign they had volunteered for, but rather, her mother’s! My teacher, of course, quickly recognized her mistake and pointed out her seemingly stereotypical blunder.

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Patriarchy: The Sneaky Villain

By: Kari S.

A few weekends ago I was sitting on my friend’s back porch with two of my girlfriends and two young men I had never met before. We were all trying to decide on which bar to attend in the city. The bar we all agreed to enforced a cover charge for men, but women were allowed to enter for free. When we made this clear to the gentlemen, they began complaining in a tirade of ignorance about how women are “so lucky” and if we really wanted equal opportunity then we would have to give up all the free drinks and the free access to bars. I feel like this is one of the most common complaints I hear from men about equality and privilege, and I actually have grown quite numb to it, to the extent that I rarely bother to comment or argue. But today I want to address such complaints and explain why they are illegitimate in their foundations.

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Comics for the Day of the Girl!

This awesome comic was created by Belén Rivas, age 12, for her project for this year’s Day of the Girl. Belén and her classmates, known as the Huckleberry Girls, are mounting a local campaign to ask residents not to wear make-up on October 11. They are also petitioning their city government of Santa Clarita in California for a proclamation for the Day of the Girl. Way to go, Huckleberry Girls!

If you’re a resident of Santa Clarita and would like to get involved, contact Lori Rivas at lrivasx4@yahoo.com.

If you’ve made art and videos and would like to share them with us, email joanne@dayofthegirl.org.

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Talking Goes Farther than Censoring

By: Joanne C.

I think censoring is for people who are afraid. I can maybe understand the idea that we should protect innocent minds from the evils of our lives. Maybe we should let our younger compatriots live a few more blissfully ignorant days.

But fear doesn’t solve anything. It makes us run away from our problems. It makes us silence certain topics, and deny that horrors exist. Where will that get us?

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WMD: Women’s Menstrual Device

By: Hanna B.

Recently the states of Texas and North Carolina have banned the possession of women’s menstrual products such as tampons and pads inside their state senate galleries. Republican reasoning behind the ban is their fear of the tampons being used as projectile weapons by “progressive activists,” during senate proceedings. Meanwhile in Texas it is currently legal for those with a permit to carry a concealed weapon into the state senate galleries.

I can see why some slow minded individuals might confuse a tampon with a pistol: both project an object out of a hollow cylinder, but can one really mistake absorbent fibers for a bullet, or even assume the former could cause more damage than the latter?

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Maiden Names, Family Names, and What’s the Big Deal?

By: Sharmin S.

My father was always a great man of his time; although he was raised in a time period and place that failed to observe women’s rights, he always believed a female’s individual identity was necessary for her to prosper. At the time of my birth, my father made the swift decision of naming me with a name divergent from what society considered conventional. He named me Sharmin Shanur. To many of you right now this name does not seem unusual, rather it just looks like two words put together, it also seemed like that to me; but as I aged and started to understand the culture of society I began to realize how different it was and the effect it would have on me.

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