Celebrating This 100% Youth-Led Movement!

By: Wendy Lesko

One year before the United Nations approved the resolution to establish the International Day of the Girl Child, nearly 100 young activists with School Girls Unite initiated the successful national campaign to mobilize U.S. support for this annual girls’ rights day. As October 11th approaches, these change agents continue to expand the U.S. Action Team by including girls from all backgrounds and persuasions across the country to help drive this effort. “We’re on the precipice of something big,” predicts Anika Manzoor, 22, who’s been an advocate for gender equality since age 12.  Eliana Stanislawski, 17, emphasizes that it’s not enough to just learn about the problem: “There has to be value in that knowledge that incites action.”

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Happy Birthday…

This is a poem I wrote for our school group. It compares the life of Amelia, a girl in a 1st world country to the life of an unnamed girl in Mali, Africa.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Gamer Girls, Nerds, and Geeks

By: Kiyun

I recently read an article on Scientific American by Kyle Hill, one of the magazine’s affiliated online bloggers, titled “What’s in a Nerd: A Treatise”. He mainly discusses exactly what defines a nerd versus a geek and how both groups have recently seen an elevation of social status, but he touches on the concept of the “fake geek girl”, oftentimes presented as the “fake gamer girl”. He contends that the reason people in general, not just “fake geek girls”, are snubbed by nerds and geeks is essentially revenge—an idea of “you snubbed us, so we’ll snub you unless you can show us your nerd/geek credentials”. Unfortunately, girls are generally viewed as fakers until proven otherwise within the geek/nerd community, to the point where ‘real’ geeks and nerds attempt to actively drive geek girls out.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Idle No More

By: Jennifer H.

In November 2012, four women began a protest of the Canadian government’s policies regarding treaty rights and environmental laws. These women, Nina Wilson, Sheelah Mclean, Sylvia McAdam and Jessica Gordon were the sparks that ignited the Idle No More movement, a response to the Canadian Conservative government’s introduction of Bill C-45, which, among budget laws, included laws that stripped treaty rights and ripped away environmental protection. The protests grew in size and began spreading across Canada and in parts of the United States. Soon, people from all over the world, including indigenous* people from various parts of the globe, expressed great support and solidarity. Flash round dances, speaker events, and bigger rallies began being organized and the grassroots movement grew into something international. What I found remarkable as I watched the movement take flight was the connectedness of oppressed people all over the globe– the photos of signs held in solidarity were sent in from Afghanistan, Japan, England, and countless other nations from people of all backgrounds. There was an immense amount of solidarity expressed for indigenous people of Canada, who have been neglected to be treated justly for far too long. At first glance, one wouldn’t make the connection of feminism to Idle No More. However, they share quite a lot of similarities. Most importantly, Idle No More, like feminism, is another movement that hopes to bring justice and equality to a social minority. Both were started by women out of necessity to have their voices heard. From Native Studies classes and Idle No More speakers, I have learned that women in indigenous communities traditionally play a prominent role. While every First Nation has different roles and expectations of women, it appears that culturally, indigenous communities have a sense of gender equality. In fact, the prominence women had in indigenous communities have been noted even by early white feminists. Idle No More brings to light the power of women, not only in an indigenous context but in global, political contexts as well.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

What do my clothes say about me?

By Joanne C

I prefer to wear t-shirts. I’ve worn Converse sneakers since 6th grade –  that was ten years ago. I don’t know how to do my make up; I don’t even own blush. My ‘style’ makes me feel comfortable…

Read more
Add your reaction Share

The Importance of Girls’ Education

By Nina 

Here at Day of the Girl and School Girls Unite, we care a whole lot about girls’ education. We spend time each week helping a group of girls in Mali, we lobby to pass bills that help education, and we create events, like the Day of the Girl, to help promote education for girls.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

He likes pink.

By Kari S 

So what if my husband likes pink?

Read more
Add your reaction Share

The Beauty Challenge

When did you stop thinking you were beautiful?

Read more
1 reaction Share

On Feminism's Failures

By Kiyun 

I am not a feminist. I haven’t been one for one week shy of five months, as of the moment I’m typing this. In a world where many feminists are beginning to ask, “Why aren’t you a feminist?” my statement might seem odd, particularly when so much effort has been put into making sure the message of what feminism is really about becomes widespread. However, with all the talk of why people should be feminists, many are neglecting to address “legitimate” reasons, ones not based in gross misconceptions of feminism, why many choose to reject the feminist movement.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

The United States is racist.

By Molly W

The United States is racist.

Read more
Add your reaction Share

Attend or host event Volunteer